Community Growing

English

Business & Water Rates in Scotland

This factsheet provides a brief overview of business (non-domestic) and water rates, as they apply to community growing groups in Scotland (including community gardens, market gardens, allotments and community agricultural projects).  The contents of this factsheet apply to Scotland only. Please download the document using the link below:

Factsheet: Business (non domestic) and water rates in Scotland

 

 

 

English

Community Empowerment Participation Requests

New rights have come into effect in Scotland (from April 1, 2017) which will enable communities to identify local needs and issues and request action to be taken on them by public sector authorities and Health Boards. 

English

Case Study: Wild Elements

Wild Elements is a social enterprise based in North Wales, dedicated to getting people outdoors and closer to nature in a fun way, through forest schools and outdoor play schemes and community projects and events. It was set up by Thomas Cockbill and Resi Tomat in March 2013. They had previously been working for the National Trust at Penrhyn Castle, near Bangor, Gwynedd, carrying out education activities. When that project finished, they could see a need for nature-based play services in the local area.

English

Case Study: Borth Community Gardens

Borth Community Gardens is an initiative to create a space for local people to grow their own food in a communal environment. The allotments and community gardens are located near St. Matthew's Church, Borth, Ceredigion. Activities on the site include gardening, work parties by locals and visiting groups, as well as Open Day events and more informal get-togethers. In addition to cultivated land, the gardens are now home to several chickens, a couple of ducks and bee hives on the community garden section.

English

Case Study: Talgarth Mill, Wales

An innovative land purchase by a Community Interest Company has given a unique, community-run flour mill space for gardening at a peppercorn rent.

English

Pros and Cons of taking on extra land

Successful groups who have done a good job with a project frequently find that they are offered additional sites to work their magic on.  We often find that these groups feel obliged to say yes to the extra land but with hindsight they wished they had said no!

The aim of this guidance is to support you through this decision process, giving you points to consider so you can decide whether  your group should say ‘yes’ or ‘no’ to taking on extra land.

English

Guidance for Registered Social Landlords

This guidance is aimed at Registered Social Landlords such as housing associations which may want to get involved in community gardening or design community gardens or allotments into their plans. It is intended as a primer to help RSLs understand the needs and benefits of community growing and draws on examples of current housing-led community growing projects and explains how each has been developed.

English

Contaminated Land Guidance

A new guide for community gardeners and allotment holders, offering information about growing food on land that may be contaminated, has been launched by the Grow Your Own Working Group in Scotland, in response to an increasing demand from community groups. The information is aimed at groups in Scotland, but is also a useful base guide for other areas of the UK including England and Wales

English

Case Study: Llangollen Community Garden

This organic food-growing community garden, based on the site of an abandoned plot in Llangollen, is owned by Denbighshire County Council which gave permission for the development of community growing in 2012. It’s an excellent example of the process of setting up a community garden on a council site, with a licence rather than a lease.

Catherine Veasey, who has been involved in the development of the garden through the local Friends Of The Earth group, describes more about the garden and how it worked with the council.

English

Plans for Social Investment Tax Relief to be Extended

The government plans to extend social investment tax relief to small community farming and horticultural activities, after recommendations during the consultation from the Community Land Advisory Service.

English

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Community Growing

Contact:

© Community Land Advisory Service 2018